Defense Contractors, Greedy Insurance Companies and the Epidemic of Suicides After Middle East Service

 

The conclusion that it is all personally-manifested mental illness causing the bizarre behavior and suicides does not fly with me.  This man was a Marine, and certainly was well trained to withstand stress in a war zone.  I really do believe there are other elements contributing to this problem, both for military personnel who serve in the Middle East, as well as the civilian contractors who do the same.  It seems to me that physical causes must exist due to perhaps some exposure to something chemical or biological, or residue from some of our weapons of choice,  (natural or man created), which may contribute to the mental/emotional symptoms.  As long as companies like KBR are allowed to spin the investigations and evidence, and the military and insurance companies are allowed to silence the victims, we may never know the truth.  Refusal to come through with the insurance in these cases, should be considered a criminal investigation by our government, and treated as such. 

GFS

 

The Other Victims of Battlefield Stress; Defense Contractors’ Mental Health Neglected

Friday 26 February 2010

by: T. Christian Miller, ProPublica

Excerpt: 

Redding, California – Wade Dill does not figure into the toll of war dead. An exterminator, Dill took a job in Iraq for a company contracted to do pest control on military bases. There, he found himself killing disease-carrying flies and rabid dogs, dodging mortars and huddling in bomb shelters.

Dill, a Marine Corps veteran, was a different man when he came back for visits here, his family said: moody, isolated, morose. He screamed at his wife and daughter. His weight dropped. Dark circles haunted his dark brown eyes.

Three weeks after he returned home for good, Dill booked a room in an anonymous three-story motel alongside Interstate 5. There, on July 16, 2006, he shot himself in the head with a 9 mm handgun. He left a suicide note for his wife and a picture for his daughter, then 16. The caption read: “I did exist and I loved you.”

More than three years later, Dill’s loved ones are still reeling, their pain compounded by a drawn-out battle with an insurance company over death benefits from the suicide. Barb Dill, 47, nearly lost the family’s home to foreclosure. “We’re circling the drain,” she said.

While suicide among soldiers has been a focus of Congress and the public, relatively little attention has been paid to the mental health of tens of thousands of civilian contractors returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. When they make the news at all, contractors are usually in the middle of scandal, depicted as cowboys, wastrels or worse.

No agency tracks how many civilian workers have killed themselves after returning from the war zones. A small study in 2007 found that 24 percent of contract employees from DynCorp, a defense contractor, showed signs of depression or post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, after returning home. The figure is roughly equivalent to those found in studies of returning soldiers.

If the pattern holds true on a broad scale, thousands of such workers may be suffering from mental trauma, said Paul Brand, the CEO of Mission Critical Psychological Services, a firm that provides counseling to war zone civilians. More than 200,000 civilians work in Afghanistan and Iraq, according to the most recent figures.

“There are many people falling through the cracks, and there are few mechanisms in place to support these individuals,” said Brand, who conducted the study while working at DynCorp.”There’s a moral obligation that’s being overlooked. Can the government really send people to a war zone and neglect their responsibility to attend to their emotional needs after the fact?”  (Read on)

Link to original:  http://www.truthout.org/defense-contractors%E2%80%99-mental-health-neglected57255

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